Rosie O’Donnell fully supports “imposing martial law” to prevent Donald Trump from taking office on Friday.

Foul-mouthed comedienne Amy Schumer calls the president-elect an “orange, sexual assaulting, fake-college-starting monster,” while Cher quips, “Support him!? I’d rather chew glass.”

Johnny Depp, convinced Trump will end the country as we know it, said he will be the “actual last president of the United States.”

Rocker Bruce Springsteen told Rolling Stone, “The republic is under siege by a moron.”

On and on we could go. There is no shortage of panic, prattle, and extreme consternation coming from the entertainment industry regarding the reality of President Donald Trump. But guess what, Hollywood? Nobody cares.

Nobody cares what disgruntled, far-removed-from-most-of-reality celebrities “think.” With the inauguration just hours away, it is wonderful that the Talledaga College marching band is coming from Alabama to play, rather than bringing U2 from Ireland. The Founding Fathers who bled and died to give us America would be pleased that President-Elect Trump wants this inauguration to be for “the people,” not the “elites.”

These outraged celebs must remember how their opulent bread got buttered. The American people who see the movies and buy the music put all those dollars in their entitled pockets. And millions of hardworking, God-fearing Americans who have watched this country veer more and more left are unmoved and unimpressed by the opinions of Hollywood.

It is fine to publicly disagree with a leader’s position and policies. But to call for the overthrow of the lawful, legitimate process by which presidents and leaders are elected — that’s another story.

Star Power Has Its Limits
Part of the outrage must be due to the fact that, deep down, some of the entertainment elites are realizing that their voice no longer matters. The White House and the entertainment industry have been in bed for the past eight years, and that tryst is now over! All of the star power in the country (and from other parts of the world) couldn’t get Hillary elected. Now, that is sinking in. And for many a celeb, it hurts. Boo hoo.

Singer Katy Perry helped with an anti-Trump march earlier this month. Remember that Perry started her career as a Christian singer, and yet in 2013 was on record stating some Hollywood-friendly, very PC views about God: “I don’t believe in a heaven or a hell or an old man sitting on a throne … I’m not Buddhist, I’m not Hindu, I’m not Christian, but I still feel like I have a deep connection with God.”

All of these celebrity “words of wisdom” make this point: Unless they have a commitment to objective moral truth — that is, unless they have righteous convictions and live a life of true character — no one should care a stitch about celebrities’ political opinions. Why? Because morality comes from God. If someone’s moral compass is not tethered to God, why should we look to them for direction? We should not be surprised that Katy Perry, who bailed on her Lord, would attack America’s constitutional processes when they didn’t go her way.

Keeping Our Feet on the Ground
I remember one of the first times I was at a function with some bona fide celebrities. In the green room were easily half a dozen Grammy winners and also a few people who had just appeared in a film that was No. 1 at the box office.

Sure, I was kind of star-struck. But watching these famous faces eat from the buffet table, spill beverages on their shirt, fumble in their pockets and just not be “on,” it dawned on me how normal these folks appeared. I deeply respected the people in the room, but they didn’t inhale angel breath and exhale rainbows. They were just people in a different line of work than me.

That’s why the indignation of Meryl Streep and other elites is irrelevant and meaningless. Hollywood, please remember that America made you rich and gave you a platform. For most celebrities, odds are extremely high they wouldn’t have gotten that anywhere else.

Thomas Jefferson famously said, “In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock.” To most in the entertainment industry, life is all about style. The confusion of style for substance is why many celebs will wax eloquent about saving the planet or the tyranny of body shaming, but think nothing of murdering a human through abortion. They know no true principles — and by this, I mean objective moral principles.

It has been my pleasure to meet a fair number of entertainment figures. I can deeply respect the music and films created by the incredibly talented people in L.A. and New York, many of whom have sacrificed their lives for their art. There is merit in that, and the people and their art can be inspiring. But remember — even famous people are just people.

 Thomas Jefferson famously said, “In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock.” To most in the entertainment industry, life is all about style. The confusion of style for substance is why many celebs will wax eloquent about saving the planet or the tyranny of body shaming, but think nothing of murdering a human through abortion. They know no true principles — and by this, I mean objective moral principles.

It has been my pleasure to meet a fair number of entertainment figures. I can deeply respect the music and films created by the incredibly talented people in L.A. and New York, many of whom have sacrificed their lives for their art. There is merit in that, and the people and their art can be inspiring. But remember — even famous people are just people.

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Written by Alex McFarland
Alex McFarland serves as Director of the Center for Apologetics and Christian Worldview, North Greenville University, located in South Carolina (www.ngu.edu). www.alexmcfarland.com